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Course Descriptions

ENGL095M - Integrated Reading and Writing (4-0-4)

This course is designed for students with Accuplacer placement scores of 55-69 in reading, greater than or equal to 60 in sentence skills, and a 4 on the writing sample. Students will develop proficiency in intermediate reading and writing skills. The course emphasizes more advanced skills in reading such as identifying main ideas in long works and across chapters, applying concrete connections to and among abstract passages or ideas, and performing close, critical readings of texts supported by evidence. The course further exposes students to research articles, scholarly texts, and models of persuasive writing in order to prepare them for the research and argument skills necessary for College Composition I. Students will be expected to reach proficiency in effective written communication including sound mechanics (spelling, punctuation, and grammar), improved vocabulary and diction (word choice), varied sentence structure, tense agreement, use of topic sentences and supporting details, and overall development of one singular thesis. Students will also begin to practice information literacy through research exercises and a penultimate annotated bibliography project. This course may not be applied to certificate or degree requirements. Upon completion of the course students must demonstrate the acquisition of these intermediate skills through a final assessment in both reading and writing. A grade of “C” or better is required to advance to ENGL110M.

Prerequisite: Placement testing. Students can elect to take the English Language Learners section of ENGL095M. This section approaches reading and writing from the perspective of students whose first language is not English.

ENGL110M - College Composition I (4-0-4)

As the cornerstone of College Composition I, students will conduct intensive semester-long research on a topic culminating in an appropriately formatted and documented 10-12-page persuasive research paper. The course emphasizes writing as a process that undergoes various stages toward completion and engages a variety of rhetorical approaches. This process-writing method gives students the tools that underlie effective academic writing and ensures adherence to the conventions of standard written English.

Students registering for some sections of the ENGL110M course are required to bring their own device to class. Devices should be a laptop or tablet with a minimum 10 inch screen, an external keyboard, an Office 365 installation, and wireless capabilities. Check the college course schedule to see if the specific section of this course that you are registering for has this requirement. Any questions or concerns regarding this requirement should be directed to the Advising Center at 206-8140.

Prerequisite: Qualifying Accuplacer placement score or ENGL095M with grade of “C” or better.

Students can elect to take the English Language Learners section of ENGL110M or ENGL110XM. This section approaches reading and writing from the perspective of students whose first language is not English.

ENGL110XM - College Composition I with Corequisite (4-2-5)

As the cornerstone of College Composition I, students will conduct intensive semester-long research on a topic culminating in an appropriately formatted and documented 10-12 page persuasive research paper. The course emphasizes writing as a process that undergoes various stages toward completion and engages a variety of rhetorical approaches. This process-writing method gives students the tools that underlie effective academic writing and ensures adherence to the conventions of standard written English. College Composition I - Corequisite is designed for students who need practice in foundational skills while simultaneously engaging college-level reading, writing, and research skills. Weekly lab sessions will reinforce skills and topics directly related to the lecture and assignments. Prerequisites: Accuplacer placement.

ENGL113M - Introduction to Public Speaking (3-0-3)

This course prepares students to effectively communicate with audiences in academic, workplace and community settings by providing instruction and experience in formal speech preparation and delivery. Students will learn to analyze speaking situations and adapt messages for audience, purpose, and context. Topic selection, relevant sources of support, structure, organization, and delivery are emphasized. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

Students can elect to take the English Language Learners section of ENGL1113M. This section approaches public speaking from the perspective of students whose first language is not English.

ENGL200M - Topics in Literature (3-0-3)

Covers selected literary themes such as gothic, science fiction, or women’s literature. Students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisites: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL201M - Survey of Poetry (3-0-3)

Along with studying the formal elements of poetry (rhythm, rhyme, figurative language), students learn to identify genre, incorporate critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisites: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL202M - Introduction to Drama (3-0-3)

Presents drama as a major literary form, through reading, discussing and writing about a representative selection of English and American plays as well as plays in translation. A variety of genres and time periods are studied. Written texts are supplemented by filmed adaptations and/or live performances. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL203M - Introduction to Journalism (3-0-3)

Introduces the basic principles of journalism including researching, writing, editing and reporting news for publication in print and electronic media. Students gain practice in producing assignments under deadline that meet the “ABC” standard (accuracy, brevity, clarity) and conform to general guidelines of the Associated Press. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English elective requirement)

ENGL204M - Children’s Literature (3-0-3)

In this course, students will read, discuss, and evaluate an array of classic and contemporary children’s literature. In addition to identifying works by genre, students will consider these works as literature and focus on their role in both shaping and reflecting changing concepts of children and childhood. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL205M - The Novel (3-0-3)

In this course, students study the novel, a genre as vast as it is prolific. The course is not, however, a survey attempting to exhaust the topic. Rather, students read, interpret, and analyze a variety of novels (selected by the instructor and approved by the department), applying critical contexts and practicing various theoretical approaches to the readings.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

ENGL206M - Professional Communication (3-0-3)

Building on skills developed in College Composition I with Corequisite or College Composition I, this course introduces students to the basic principles of professional written and oral communication. Using an audience-centered approach, students practice presenting information such as instructions, proposals, reports, electronic communication and product/service information in clear, concise and understandable terms. Document design and formatting are also covered. Frequent oral presentations are required. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English elective requirement)

ENGL207M - Introduction to Literary Analysis (3-0-3)

In this course students read, analyze, interpret and respond critically to notable works of fiction, poetry and drama. Emphasis is placed on learning critical reading strategies. The formal elements of literature and the major principles of literary criticism are introduced. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL208M - Modern World Poetry: A Conversation Across Cultures (3-0-3)

This course encourages students to explore poetic voice and vision and to “break bread” with the world, to paraphrase W.H. Auden, by reading and discussing poems of various cultures and languages (translated into English). Students will read, analyze, and form perspectives on a selection of poems from Latin America, Asia, Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, and other regions. The final project in the course focuses on research, analysis, and presentation of poets from a culture of the student’s choice. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL209M - Heroes and Villains of the Middle Ages (3-0-3)

This course designed to explore the ideas of heroes and villains by reading a variety of literary and historical texts. What makes for a hero in the Middle Ages? A villain? How are they presented, celebrated, and punished in medieval texts? What themes and characteristics are still present in today’s society (e.g., ideas of chivalry and religious faith) and which ones are peculiar to the Middle Ages? Through a discussion of medieval texts, we get to explore our shared values and identify significant differences, and this course will offer some historical background for later developments in literary tastes and trends. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ENGL110XM or ENGL110M or permission from the English Department Chair. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement and a pre-1800 literature course for English majors)

ENGL210M - Science Fiction: Evolution, Ethics, and Technology (3-0-3)

For centuries Science Fiction has addressed the big questions of human existence: Who are we? What does it mean to be human? What is the definition of life? Where do we as a species go from here? At its best Science Fiction is the “literature of ideas” and explores the changes that face us, the consequences of these changes, and possible solutions. In this course students will examine literature that contends with the definition of humanness, contemporary ethical issues, and the relationship between technology and humanity. Course readings will help students explore key questions about the human condition that become increasingly relevant as science and technology evolve in our fast-changing world. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL211M - Introduction to Technical Writing (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the basic principles and procedures of technical writing in what is popularly known as the “information” or “communications age.” It teaches students to focus on the audience’s need for useful information and not the writer’s own need for creative self-expression. Students will learn to create useful workplace communications (including instructions, proposals, reports, online documents, microblog posts, wikis, and product/service information) for both print and web-based mediums. While the focus is on writing, the development of critical thinking skills is heavily emphasized and forms an important component of the course. Using an audience-centered approach, students will learn the difference between readers and users, and how that affects the technical writer’s approach to researching and presenting information. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

ENGL213M - Creative Writing (3-0-3)

Students learn and practice the techniques of creative writing using a combination of lecture, writing exercises and workshops. Using the writing process, students produce finished works of fiction and poetry, exploring and incorporating elements such as point of view, dialog, characterization, setting, imagery and poetic form and structure. Course readings are used for discussion, inspiration and idea development. Peer review and instructor feedback constitute a significant component of the course. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL214M - Creative Nonfiction (3-0-3)

In this course students are introduced to the fourth genre of writing, creative nonfiction. Students learn to incorporate the techniques of fiction such as scenes, dialog, descriptions and conflict/resolution into original pieces of nonfiction. Drawing on course readings for essay models and idea development, students produce creative nonfiction works such as the personal essay, the memoir, nature and science writing and literary journalism. Peer review and instructor feedback constitute a significant component of the course. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL218M - Short Story (3-0-3)

In this course, students study the short story as a major literary genre, reading, interpreting and analyzing a representative selection of texts. Students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL220M - College Composition II (4-0-4)

The continuation of College Composition I with Corequisite or College Composition I this course builds on the composition and research foundation acquired in ENGL110XM or ENGL110M and concentrates centrally on argumentative writing and advanced research methods. Students are instructed in analytical reading techniques, critical research methods, information literacy standards and current documentation procedures in preparation for the culminating research thesis. The College Composition II research thesis demonstrates fluency in argumentative and research strategies as well as competency in information literacy skills. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M with a grade of C or better or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL223M - British Literature I (3-0-3)

A survey of the major works of British literature from its Anglo-Saxon origins to 1800 in their cultural, social, historical, political and literary contexts. Formal literary criticism is included as well as analysis of structure. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL224M - British Literature II (3-0-3)

A survey of the major works of British literature from 1800 to the present in their cultural, social, historical, political and literary contexts. Formal literary criticism is included as well as analysis of structure. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL225M - Shakespeare (3-0-3)

In this course, students study the works of Shakespeare, with emphasis on the plays. In particular, students read, interpret and analyze no fewer than seven of Shakespeare’s plays, including the four major genres: comedy, romance, history and tragedy. Moreover, students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL227M - Survey of African American Literature (3-0-3)

This course will examine the written and oral works produced by African-Americans over their 400-year history and place these works in historical context. Students will read a wide selection of non-fiction and fiction including, but not limited to, slave narratives, poetry, plays, short stories, novel excerpts, and speeches. Students will apply critical thinking skills to the readings supported, when possible, by audio and video presentations. This course contains a strong historical perspective and students will be encouraged to discuss how this literature reflects on the past while relating to current racial issues. Course themes will include identity, authenticity, double-consciousness, passing, and protest. Prerequisites: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL228M - Satirical Literature (3-0-3)

For millennia satire has used wit and humor for the purpose of social criticism. From Horace and Juvenal to South Park and Saturday Night Live, satire often reveals the vices, follies, and abuses of society toward necessary improvement. Satire confronts public discourse and asks citizens to question the often-unchallenged institutions of government, education, and religion. This course traces the role of satire in literature from the first through the 21st century, connecting the past with the immediate present, and demonstrating the role satire has played and continues to play in exposing individuals to the fallacies of their respective generations. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement and pre-1800 requirement for English majors).

ENGL229M - Mythology as Literature (3-0-3)

In this course students will examine how mythology influences a wide range of contemporary literature and art such as the modern novel, film, poetry, and song. Students will read, analyze, and research classical myths, poetry that reflects these classical myths, and modern novels that use mythology to examine everyday humanity. The course will also explore the creation of modern mythology in its most recent incarnation through the comic book hero. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL230M - American Literature I (3-0-3)

This course samples American Literature from its beginnings to the Civil War, emphasizing themes that have left their mark on American consciousness. Formal literary criticism is included as well as analysis of structure. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)

ENGL235M - American Literature II (3-0-3)

This course samples American literature from the Civil War to the present day, emphasizing themes that have left their mark on American consciousness. Formal literary criticism is included as well as analysis of structure. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL110XM or ENGL110M. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement)