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Course Descriptions

ENGL200M - Special Topics in Literature: Lost in Translation

In this course, students study selected literary themes such as gothic, science fiction, or women’s literature. Students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

The Spring Special Topics in Literature course will explore contemporary fiction that has been adapted into film, television, or other mediums (stage, art). Students will analyze these translations and make sense of what has been lost or gained.

ENGL200M - Special Topics: Immigration Narratives

News of immigration is viral in this first quarter of the 21st century. At the same time business is booming for companies that provide Ancestry Profiles Those very profiles show us that at some point in the nearly 250-year history of America every one of us are the leaves and branches of family trees rooted in immigration to America. This course is designed to give students an understanding of what life is like in America for Immigrants and their families. Why did they leave their homelands? What was the journey like? What did they bring? How were they received by the previous waves of immigrants? How were they instrumental in making America the dream that so many will sacrifice so much to achieve? We will look for answers in their stories, essays, poetry, art, music, ideas, and the world-famous popular culture they created and inspired. The primary objective of our exploration is to introduce/encourage critical thinking/understanding and thoughtful writing about all our Immigration stories. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

ENGL200M - Special Topics: King Arthur and His Knights

This course covers Arthurian literature from its origins in medieval times to the 18th century. Students focus specifically on the literary development of the Arthurian characters and stories through the historical eras and cultures in which the stories were written. Students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement AND pre-1800 literature requirement)

ENGL200M - Special Topics: Lost Souls of Literature

This course will enter into the minds of some of literature’s most tormented protagonists, identifying the demons that haunted them. We will begin with The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which is in many ways a parable of Stevenson’s struggle with his own strict Protestant roots. Next, we will read Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, where Wilde explores the possibility of a life without conscience or consequence. Finally, we will enter the 20th century and examine the sheltering Catholicism of Virgin Suicides and the empty, white-collar materialism of Fight Club. As we analyze this eclectic assortment of novels, we will trace the universal themes they address, formulating our own philosophies regarding the complex interplay between body, mind, and soul.

Prerequisite: ENGL110M

ENGL200M - Topics in Literature: Changing Bodies

Literature is riddled with stories of people whose bodies undergo some wildly unnatural change, from myths to fantasy to horror. Course readings will include tales of metamorphoses, and assignments/discussions will revolve around what fascinates about stories of changing forms. Tales will range from classical myths (e.g., Narcissus and Echo) to fairy tales (Beauty and the Beast) to horror (werewolves). An examination of "the body" in literature, then, ultimately becomes a question of “what does it mean to be human?”

Prerequisite: ENGL110M

ENGL207M - Introduction to Literary Analysis

“Bring on the Bad Guys”

This spring, we will focus on the villain of the piece. What is it about the bad guy that we find so appealing? Do we want the heroes to win, or is there some reason to root for the villain? What happens if there’s no story, as with many poems: is the conflict then between the author and audience? If so, is the poet the villain of our own stories, because they challenge us to make sense of their work? Readings may tend to the dark side, and will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, selected works by Edgar Allan Poe, and Susan Glaspell’s “Trifles.”

A grade of "C" or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

ENGL218M - Short Story: Exotic Tales

In this course, students study the short story as a major literary genre, reading, interpreting, and analyzing a representative selection of texts. Students apply critical contexts and practice various theoretical approaches to the readings. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

The Winterim Short Story course will take students on an international journey, reading short stories from less explored lands, near-deserted spaces, and places we think we know quite well until we revisit them in story.

SPCL205M - Poetry Workshop

In this course, students will learn and practice the techniques of writing poetry using a combination of lecture, writing exercises, and workshops. Through the use of the writing process, students will produce finished works of poetry that explore and incorporate elements such as poetic form and structure, diction, assonance and consonance, rhyme, and metaphor and simile. Course readings will be used for discussion, inspiration, and idea development. Peer review and instructor feedback constitute a significant component of the course. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

SPCL206M - Writing Short Stories

In this course, students will learn and practice the techniques of writing short fiction using a combination of lecture, writing exercises, and workshops. Through the use of the writing process, students will produce finished works of fiction that explore and incorporate elements such as point of view, dialog, characterization, setting, and imagery. Course readings will be used for discussion, inspiration, and idea development. Peer review and instructor feedback constitute a significant component of the course. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)

SPCL206M - Writing Short Stories: The Fear Factor

In this course, students will learn and practice the techniques of writing short fiction using a combination of lecture, writing exercises, and workshops. Through the use of the writing process, students will produce finished works of fiction that explore and incorporate elements such as point of view, dialog, characterization, setting, and imagery. Course readings will be used for discussion, inspiration, and idea development. Peer review and instructor feedback constitute a significant component of the course.

This fall, we will examine the element of FEAR in story-telling. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL110M or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. (Fulfills English or Humanities requirement.)